What Is Furniture?

What Is Furniture?

2021-06-25
SANDUN Furniture
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FOSHAN SAN DUN Furniture CO., LTD is an enterprise focusing on the design and quality of the products like Furniture. Our design team is composed by a master designer who has the responsibility to make decisions about the way the creative process should evolve, and a number of technical designers specialized in the industry for years. We also employ the industry experts to dominate the production process from materials selection, processing, quality control, to quality inspection.Most of our products have brought great reputation to SANDUN Furniture. Since its establishment, we have been developing with the theory of 'Customer Foremost'. At the same time, our customers give us lots of re-purchases, which is a great trust for our products and brands. Thanks to the promotion of these customers, the brand awareness and market share of have been greatly improved.The company provides one-stop services for customers at SANDUN Furniture, including product customization. The sample of Furniture is also available. Please refer to the product page for more details.
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1-2-3 Office Furniture Tips and Advice
If you have decided to open up a new office then you may want to think about purchasing the best office furniture to suit yours and your companies needs. Purchasing office furniture is quite a hard task, as you will have to consider the people you are buying it for. Sometimes you may get into hard times just thinking about what to buy yourself, let alone that of your colleagues. I believe that if you know what you are looking for, then the task becomes much a simpler process. You should get to know the people that you are working with and carefully pick up there likes and dislike, this way you cannot go wrong.A few simple facts to keep into mind when purchasing office furniture is comfort levels, as you and your staff will be using these for most of the day, infact for most of the week you will want to obtain furniture that can give you and your employees that little bit of extra comfort. Basically you will have to shop around and find furniture that is not too comfortable, but that is also not too uncomfortable, because both have there downsides. If you get furniture that is too comfortable it may put the employees off of working as they will be too relaxed, and if you get it not so comfortable they will probably start complaining.A new range that has hit the market at a tremendous rate are the ergonomic furniture parts, these are not only comfortable but will also help in reducing injuries and strains among yourself and your staff. You can get a wide variety of different ergonomic equipment which include but are not limited to keyboards, a mouse and all other parts of computer accessories, as-well as chairs and desks.All of this being said it may sound quite costly but you should always remember that the price can be quite deceiving on some items, as you may find it elsewhere if you shop around at a much lower reduced rate. So to sum up you should get the most suitable furniture for the environment you are in, not too comfortable and not too uncomfortable but always remember to take style and vision into account. Especially if you have an open plan office because you will need to look like a professional company if you are getting clients visiting on a regular basis.
Designing Men in This Economy, Can an Upstart Furniture Store Really Persuade People to
(FORTUNE Small Business) - Even if you're not a design snob, you can look around and see other people in the country leaning that way. Target sells housewares by Michael Graves and Philippe Starck. The new Disney Concert Hall in Los Angeles was designed by avant-garde architect Frank Gehry. And on the TV show Queer Eye for the Straight Guy, slobs get their apartments redone using furniture you formerly might have seen only in Scandinavian hotels. Now an upscale retailer called Design Within Reach is trying to go one step further by selling modern furniture to the masses. (Yes, those are some of its products on Queer Eye.) Based in Oakland, DWR has 14 retail locations--eight opened in the past year--with another 25 envisioned by 2005. According to the company, which is privately held, revenue has gone from $23 million in 2000 to a projected $80 million this year. DWR turned profitable within 18 months of launching. The company says its growth comes from making artfully crafted, high-quality furniture accessible--classic pieces by designers such as Ludwig Mies van der Rohe or Charles and Ray Eames. For decades, if you wanted modern furniture for your home, you had to go through interior designers or visit a boutique shop where the price of a single chair would exceed most credit card limits. Those Armani-clad jet setters who could afford it faced a three- or four-month wait for products that were custom-ordered from Europe. DWR takes a different approach, as the "Within Reach" part of its name indicates. Walk into one of its locations, and you'll be invited to sit on the couches, let your kids climb around, even bring in your dog. The sales reps are friendly, and many have degrees in design. Most important, virtually all its products can be at your door in less than ten days. The company ships from a central warehouse in Union City, Calif., and says it sends out 97% of orders within 24 hours. One thing the name does not imply, however, is "inexpensive." The classic black leather chaise from Le Corbusier will cost you $1,250 (though even that seems reasonable compared with the $2,275 that the Museum of Modern Art Design Store charges for the same piece). And that leads to perhaps the biggest question for the future of Design Within Reach. Its products are clearly beautiful and its customer service superlative, but are enough people really willing to spend that much on a chair? If you wanted to start a business in a high-growth industry, you probably wouldn't pick this one. Americans allocate less than 1% of their income to furniture each year. Maintaining inventory is extremely expensive, and the logistics of delivering a 200-pound sofa across the country undamaged require serious know-how. In that context, DWR's success so far is even more impressive, in that the founder didn't have that kind of knowledge when he started. Rob Forbes, now 50, spent 12 years as a potter, winning a National Endowment for the Arts grant and showing his work in national exhibitions before getting an MBA at Stanford. After that he worked at Williams-Sonoma and Smith & Hawken, but he couldn't shake the memory of furnishing his San Francisco apartment in 1991. He had wanted modern furniture, but everything about the process--finding it, paying for it, waiting for it to finally show up--was a headache. Forbes thought there had to be a better way, so he left his job in 1997 and spent a year talking to just about every major figure in modern design, from Frank Gehry to Michael Graves. When he had a rough business plan, he started looking for financial support. He was rejected by 13 VCs but did line up enough backers to get the company started. Significantly, he got $50,000 from his old boss at William-Sonoma, Wayne Badovinus, who took a seat on the board. In 1999, Forbes sent out his first catalog of 52 chairs and seven tables ("Essentially 'chairs within reach,' " he jokes). The early orders came in twice as fast as he'd projected, and Forbes realized he needed a partner to run the financial and managerial end of the business. He talked to Badovinus, then quasi-retired and teaching business, and persuaded him to sign on as CEO. Badovinus wasn't a natural fit for selling $999 Noguchi coffee tables. The son of a nomadic construction worker, he didn't live in a house with a foundation until college. He was, however, a retail veteran. He spent the first half of his career at Nordstrom, where he became the first VP outside the Nordstrom family, and later served as CEO of Eddie Bauer. From 1987 to 1992 he took that company from 18 stores to 200 and oversaw a revenue jump from $230 million to $1 billion. Still, he knew that DWR would require a different approach. "The top managers here have all had bigger jobs at much bigger companies," says Badovinus. "This is fun for all of us to say, 'Let's make a highly profitable business and keep our egos out.' For me, this is the final exam of a 40-year career." Early on, DWR had three sales channels: a catalog, a website, and a sales force that visited architects and interior designers. Badovinus was clear: There would be no bricks and mortar. Between rent and inventory, retail is cash-intensive, and cash is one thing the company didn't have. (In two rounds of financing, DWR raised $10 million, not a lot during the peak of the dot-com bubble.) However, the industry customers clamored for a showroom to touch and feel the products. As a test, Badovinus agreed to put some furniture samples in DWR's street-level office for designers to see. He was surprised to find regular folks walking in off the street and wanting to buy things. A fourth sales channel was born: stores without inventory, dubbed "studios" because they let you see the furniture and even buy it, but you couldn't take anything home with you. That saves on overhead, because there's no on-site storage and no worrying about whether each location has enough Eames lounge chair and ottoman sets ($2,919). So far DWR has boasted some impressive metrics. According to the company, its studios bring in between $600 and $1,000 per square foot in sales, compared with an average of $442 for the top 100 specialty-furnishings retailers. Some of that difference comes from the higher-priced items DWR sells and from the type of real estate it prefers. Most stores average 3,400 square feet, as opposed to, say, Pottery Barn, whose stores typically range from 8,000 to 12,000 square feet. Badovinus recently passed on prime space along Manhattan's Madison Avenue, in part because he thought the price was too high. The company has other ways of making its name known, especially among architects and designers, who account for about half of all its sales. Unlike retailers such as Crate & Barrel, which brands the furniture it sells as its own, DWR gives credit to the designer wherever possible, often placing her photo next to the product in the catalog. (The famous ones even get a biography on the website--how else would you learn that Philippe Starck dropped out of school?) San Francisco designer Ted Boerner started selling sofas and chairs through DWR in 2002. "After ten years of doing business under my own name," he says, "one page about me in the DWR catalog, and calls jumped 30%. It's like I've been knighted." Not so thrilled are independent modern-furniture store owners, who are DWR's only direct competition. Says one Southern California merchant, who asks not to be named: "Have I lost business because of DWR? Of course." DWR also uses its studios--which are always on city streets, never in malls--to hold evening seminars on design, such as a session with rug designer Angela Adams or a fitting clinic for Niels Diffrient's Freedom office chairs ($895). "We want our studios to be neighborhood hangouts for design junkies," says Badovinus. Forbes sends out a weekly e-mail newsletter to 250,000 subscribers, with topics ranging from architecture in Venice to the design of the Portland mass-transit system to the 60 new items on sale at DWR. So far the newsletter's unsubscribe rate is just 0.02%. "Everyone I know who is interested in design reads it," says Andrew Capitman, an investment banker who in 1976 launched the renovation of the art deco district in Miami's South Beach. "They really cater to the design community," says Keven Wilder, who founded Chiasso, a housewares retailer, in 1985 and is now a retail consultant at Wilder & Associates. "The newsletter is pitched to people in the design industry and aficionados and wannabes. They're going after influencers." Design Within Reach's early success notwithstanding, are those influencers enough? DWR's market research suggests that only about 10% of Americans have a taste for modern furniture. (In Europe that number is around 40%, in part because of the rebuilding after World War II.) Modern design is primarily an urban phenomenon among well-educated, high-income consumers. Twenty percent of DWR customers earn more than $250,000, with the majority exceeding $75,000. Badovinus concedes that modern design is still an "esoteric niche" but feels that is in part because it's much easier to find a Chippendale chair than a Mies van der Rohe day bed (which DWR sells for $2,995). By making Mies more available and presenting his work in a less intimidating context, Badovinus hopes to expand the market. The market is certainly watching with keen interest. Alan Heller, whose company, Heller, manufactures chairs for DWR, worries that DWR's efforts to appeal to a broader audience may lead the company to design that looks more like "Pottery Barn Within Reach." Says Heller: "Rob Forbes speaks to the design community with tremendous credibility. If that gets watered down, it's a different company." Competitors also seem to be watching. In April 2002, Williams-Sonoma, which owns Pottery Barn, launched West Elm, a catalog of modern-inspired furnishings and housewares with prices seemingly aimed at the post-college crowd. (The first West Elm store is set to open this month.) Badovinus is less worried about competition--anything that moves modern toward the mainstream, he says, is good for DWR--than about establishing the formal policies and systems to carry his firm past the $100 million mark, when he says a company can no longer be fueled on enthusiasm alone. To do this, the 60-year-old CEO returns to lessons he learned from his mentor, Lloyd Nordstrom. Like good modern design, he says, winning in retail is all about simplicity: "Know the customer. Have what they want when they want it. And kill them with kindness."
The Growing Business of Active Shooter Countermeasures
"911. What's your emergency?" "There's someone with a gun at the main entrance to the mall."--FEMA Institute Emergency Management course on the "Active Shooter" Trending News Google Cloud Outage Missing Connecticut Mom Virginia Beach Shooting Protester Interrupts Harris Our domestic battlefield is evolving as America comes to terms with shooting tragedies like those in Orlando, Florida, and San Bernardino, California, and the drumbeat of far-reaching threats from abroad. Police negotiators who try to talk assailants into freeing hostages, or your hope of survival by taking refuge under desks or in bathroom stalls seem like ancient history, while the 2,500-year old classic "The Art of War" feels like the future. U.S. Joint Base Andrews in chaos over active shooter drill The Internet is full of governmental advice on how to handle active shooters, and now private industry is also queuing up with programs and products such as ballistic office furniture and trauma kits for when invaders burst through the door."We're not in Kansas anymore," said Jim Satterfield, president of Firestorm, a company that advertises itself as "America's Crisis Coach."All of this will alter the way you eye your fellow employees, the way your employer scrutinizes you and --perhaps -- even the way you look at yourself. Here are some changes that you'll see:Spying is a dirty word, even though cameras in malls, at traffic lights and on your own computer could be watching your every move. But as the number of shootings has escalated, with 20 active shooter incidents in each of the past two years, so has spying on employees, which now seems less reprehensible and more like the new reality.This is particularly true because most shooters bear a familiar face. They aren't foreign-inspired terrorists, but instead disgruntled employees, unhappy clients or contractors, or just people with bad attitudes about to go over the edge. That means they can be identified."Eighty percent of the time if someone has ill-intent, someone else knows about it, and with social media you can identify the threat," said Satterfield. San Bernardino shooting survivor describes chaos To the extent that an employer owns the social media of its company, including employee contact with the public, Firestorm provides "predictive intelligence" and data-mining that can analyze social posts to identify potential problems. Circumstances like the loss of a personal relationship, legal action, humiliation and rejection could be "the triggers for someone on the path to violence," said Satterfield. Equally important is "humint": short for human intelligence. Is someone making threats or simply acting strange? "Most people don't say something because they don't want to be a tattletale," Satterfield said. "The other problem is they don't know where to report something. You have to have anonymous reporting by texting."Because of legal risks to the company, this monitoring should be done by a third party or behind an "informational firewall," Firestorm's literature suggested.This may sound like Big Brother -- and your co-workers -- are watching you. But Satterfield said the goal of companies shouldn't be to fire employees who seem ready to explode. In fact, doing so could set him or her off on a rampage. At best, it only passes the problem along to the next company, such as the on-air shooting of two TV journalists in Roanoke, Virginia, by a former fellow staffer who had a troubled employment history."Problems don't go away," said Satterfield, who remembered the case of a diary found in a break room. The threatening pages were copied and then the diary was returned. A middle-aged woman picked it up, was given counseling and still works at the company. It confirms that anyone of any age has to be taken seriously, since at least six active shooters have been women.Arming employees is seen as another solution by some security firms. Companies like Shield Solution provide training programs for "selected employees" and teachers ever since the Newtown, Connecticut, tragedy. According to its website, "It ... offers the best protection should an armed intruder invade your school." Missouri teachers resorting to firearms training to protect kids Some educators feel this is mission impossible. "We would be asking ... educators to make a swift transition from teacher to SWAT member," said G.A. Buie, a Kansas principal.But the idea is gaining traction. In Ohio, more than 600 teachers have applied for training, and it's under consideration in Alabama, California, New Jersey and Oregon. So does it really help to give workers, even those who are trained, a Glock? Allowing guns in an office or school can be a bad idea, said Firestorm, because guns can seldom be hidden for long, especially from children.Conversely, Israel, which has experienced ongoing terrorist attacks, encourages its citizens to carry concealed weapons, thwarting many terrorist incidents. Massad Ayoub, a firearms expert who tracks gun violence, noted that mass killers frequently target sites they know are gun-free, such as a Christmas party, bar or house of worship.But Ayoub also pointed out the drawbacks: not enough practice in using a firearm, the fact that some killers now wear body armor and the possibility of being shot by the police if they arrive on scene while your gun is still drawn. Most shooters, particularly under stress, are inaccurate. Even police hit their target only 18 percent of the time, a study of the New York Police Department showed.Attacking a shooter is considered the last resort after running and hiding. But firms like Guardian Defense, which offers "Active Shooter Training" for businesses, noted that 60 percent of all incidents end prior to police arrival. In many instances, the shooter commits suicide, but in others, such as the pistol-wielding killer on a Long Island, N.Y., train, bystanders take down the assailant. Lessons in self-defense A new mentality is forming among security defense firms. With women being taught to fight back against a rapist, some companies advocate the strategy of Jeff Cooper, a World War II marine and firearms expert who penned the "Principles of Self Defense." Cooper advocated "aggressiveness, speed, ruthlessness and surprise." Don't allow your enemy to intimidate you with fear, do what he or she doesn't expect -- such as throwing a chair through a window for a distraction, seize whatever is available and attack without mercy.Forget everything your parents and teachers told you, Cooper said in his book. "Once a fight starts, there are absolutely no considerations other than winning." An FBI video presents a similar scenario.When hiding, bear in mind that most office furniture offers little protection. Ballistic Furniture Systems, a company formed by its CEO Jerry Isquith after the shooting of Arizona Representative Gabby Giffords, offers new or retrofitted furniture with material that will stop a pistol shot. But its highest level of protection -- to stop military rounds -- usually fits only under office paneling. When running away is an option -- unless you're a school teacher -- remember that you have no obligation to help others, said Guardian Defense. That's also echoed by the FBI: "Encourage others to leave with you, but don't let them slow you down."Healing comes after the fact, if at all. Companies are inventing products to care for the wounded because emergency responders may be delayed by the shooter or by threats of explosives. The true "first responders" are likely to be employees, teachers, parents or even fast-food workers who are "already on the scene when the crisis begins," said Strategos International, which provides safety and tactical training to schools, churches and corporations. Sales of counterfeit tourniquets prompts safety alert iACT, which sells "responder bags" that include control wrap to stop bleeding, a respirator, an airway opener and a video on how to use them, said a person can easily "bleed out" in four minutes, and studies show that it could take 40 minutes to an hour for professional help to arrive.After all active shooter incidents, law enforcement and firms like Firestorm do a "hot wash" to assess what went wrong and what could have been done better. Some of it helps, but it also aids the potential active shooter, who's watching it all through the media.So the battle is an ongoing equation -- with the graph of casualties trending ever higher.
Knowledge About B&q Furniture Board - Collected Stories of B&q Furniture Board
Collected stories of b&q furniture boardHollow EarthThis was the first B.P.R.D. mini-series. Three issues long, it was written by Mike Mignola, Christopher Golden and Tom Sniegoski with art by Ryan Sook and Curtis Arnold. It was published from January to June 2002.Hellboy novelist Golden and his long-time writing partner Sniegoski wrote the story with regular input from Mignola. Sook was chosen to draw the book following a meeting with Mignola at a convention in Oakland, CA in 1995 and saw it as a chance to have a book all to himself although Arnold joined as inker when schedules started running tight halfway through production.The story features Dr. Kate Corrigan, Abe Sapien, Roger the Homunculus, and newcomer Johann Kraus on a mission to rescue Liz Sherman. Hellboy also makes appearances via flashbacks.B.P.R.D. PromoA newspaper-format promotional teaser for the series titled B.P.R.D.. It was published as three single-page installments in Dark Horse Extra from December 2001 to February 2002, featuring the first appearance of Johann Kraus.The Killer in My SkullOriginally published as a back-up feature in Hellboy: Box Full of Evil #1 (September 1999). Lobster Johnson made his first appearance in this written by Mike Mignola, with pencils by Matthew Dow Smith and inks by Ryan Sook (in his first contribution to the series).In the story Johnson and his sidekick investigate a series of bizarre deaths which appear to have been committed using telekinesis.Abe Sapien versus ScienceOriginally published in 1999 as a back-up feature in Hellboy: Box Full of Evil #2 (September 1999). Abe Sapien made a solo appearance in this written and inked by Mike Mignola and with pencils by Matthew Dow Smith.In the story Sapien rescues and reanimates Roger the homunculus when B.P.R.D. scientist Dr. Roddel threatens to dissect him just as Abe recalls he threatened to do with him when he was first discovered.Drums of the DeadOriginally published as the main feature in the one-shot Abe Sapien: Drums of the Dead (March 4, 1998) with the Hellboy short story Heads by Mike Mignola as the back up feature.Abe Sapien made his first solo appearance in this story written by Brian McDonald with art by Derek Thompson.Series editor Scott Allie had been in discussions with Brian McDonald about his next project after the success of Harry the Cop and Hellboy creator Mike Mignola had been considering using Derek Thompson on a Hellboy and so it naturally evolved that the two friends should end up working together on this project.In the story weird deaths in the South Seas expose an ancient tragedy linked to the transatlantic slave trade.------Biography of b&q furniture boardRozella Pearl Beverly Blood was an only child, born 18 May 1911 in Wichita, Kansas, to Charles Gillman Blood and Sarah Dorothy 'Dollie' Sherman. She died in Boulder, Colorado on 15 December 1987.Rozella Blood enrolled in Wichita High School in 1929 and then became a student at the institution then-called the University of Wichita, earning a B.A. in 1932 and an M.S. in entomology in 1933. She went on to attend the University of Kansas Medical School as a graduate student and assistant instructor in anatomy, neurology and histology, also working as a staff artist, from 1933 to 1937. After earning a teaching certificate in Kansas, she taught science and mathematics for a year at Altoona High School starting in the fall of 1937.Researcher and teacherIn 1938, she married fellow graduate student and herpetologist Hobart M. Smith in Chicago, Illinois, and changed her name to Rozella B. Smith. They would go on to have two children, Bruce and Sally. Following the wedding, the pair left on a two-year research trip to Mexico, where they gathered more than 20,000 amphibians and reptiles, which were all preserved, tagged and transported to the Smithsonian Institution in Washington, D.C. After the trip's conclusion, the Smiths moved to Washington for a year to oversee the integration of their specimens into the Smithsonian's collections.At the University of Illinois, she attended classes as "an unattached graduate student" from 1953 to 1961. Later, in 1963, she earned a second a Master of Science degree, this time in library science. Then, she earned a second teaching certificate so she could lead classes in ancient history for a year at the University High School beginning in 1965.After moving to Boulder, Colorado, in 1968, where she worked at the University of Colorado, she gave "guidance to undergraduates, graduates, and faculty members in her own and other departments, and to affiliates of the Center for Computer Research in the Humanities, in techniques of her special forte of fixed-field data processing and retrieval, and of correlation indexing." In August 1982, she was awarded an honorary Doctor of Science degree from the University of Colorado in recognition of her work with undergraduate and graduate students.Data analysisSmith was working as head cataloger in the library of the National Center for Atmospheric Research in Boulder, Colorado, in 1966, when she began customizing new cataloging software on computers that had just been made available.She took on the job of digitizing the large quantity of data and graphics accumulated over nearly 30 years of collecting by herself and her co-author and husband. Throughout this time, supported from 1971 to 1985 with grants from the National Library of Medicine and several National Science Foundation divisions, she created the computational structures, input mechanisms, data analysis techniques and output documents. In so doing she provided essential information to her collaborator, H.M. Smith, who used her analytical results to evaluate his extensive research collection and publish more than 1,600 manuscripts, with many listing Rozella as coauthor.TaxaIn her honor, several species-group taxa bear the name rozellae, including a subspecies of snake, Tantillita lintoni rozellae, 1940, and a species of lizard, Celestus rozellae, 1942.------Route description of b&q furniture boardNY17B begins at an intersection with NY97 in the hamlet of Callicoon. Known as Mill Street for the first block, NY17B proceeds downhill and meets an intersection with the eastern end of Sullivan County Route133 (CR133). After merging with CR133, NY17B proceeds east along the East Branch of Callicoon Creek and through the town of Delaware. The mainly rural roadway winds east for several miles, reaching the southern end of the hamlet of Hortonville. Passing the intersection with CR121, the route crosses through Hortonville before turning southeast, passing multiple industries in the area.Bending further south, NY17B continues paralleling the East Branch, passing multiple farms before making several jaunts to the southeast. A short distance later, the route bends east and then northeast, reaching an intersection with NY52A. At this junction, NY17B becomes county-maintained and designated CR117. NY17B and CR117 bend southeast again, reaching a junction with NY52 in the town of Cochecton. NY17B and NY52 become concurrent, proceeding southward past multiple farms before reaching the hamlet of Fosterdale. At this junction, NY52 forks southward at an intersection with CR114 while NY17B turns eastward.NY17B passes south of Fosterdale Cemetery, passing rows of homes on the northern side of the roadway. The route passes along the southern end of Kazens Pond, crossing junctions with several local roads, including Hurd Road, which connects NY17B to the Bethel Woods Center for the Arts, the site of the Woodstock Music Festival. Now in the town of Bethel, NY17B continues eastward, passing south of Lynch's Pond. The route crosses through the hamlet of Odell, passing north of Chestnut Ridge Pond and reaching the hamlet of Bethel. Passing several cemeteries east of Bethel, the route soon reaches the White Lake area, intersecting with NY55 and CR13.Running along the southern shore of White Lake, NY17B and NY55 proceed east into the hamlet of White Lake, passing numerous lakeside homes on the northern end of the highway. A short distance into White Lake, NY55 forks north onto CR14 north towards Swan Lake. NY17B continues east out White Lake, returning to the rural areas of the town of Bethel. The route bypasses the hamlet of Smallwood, reaching an intersection with CR183 (Airport Road), which connects to Sullivan County International Airport. NY17B makes a short dart to the southeast before straightening east again and crossing over the Mongaup River.After a short parallel with the Mongaup, NY17B continues east and soon northeast into the hamlet of Coopers Corners. A short distance outside of Coopers Corners, the route crosses into Maplewood, entering the town of Thompson. The route intersects with CR59 (Kaufman Road) before reaching Valet Road, which is the access road to Monticello Raceway. The route soon passes the stables for the raceway, passing West Broadway, which connects the route to downtown Monticello. The route soon turns northeast again, crossing Jefferson Street and entering exit104 of NY17, which marks the eastern end of NY17B. The route continues northwest alongside NY17 as CR174.------Structure of b&q furniture boardThe sonata consists of four movements, a similar structure to the second sonata, with a lyrical largo rather than a funeral march.Allegro maestoso (B minor B major)Scherzo: Molto vivace (E-flat major B major E-flat major)Largo (B major E major B major)Finale: Presto non tanto (B minor B major)Unlike the composer's first and second sonatas, the work ends in a major key. A performance of the sonata lasts around 25 to 30 minutes.The work opens on a martial note, the heavy chords and filigree in the opening of the first movement giving way to a more melodic second theme, eventually leading to the conclusion of the exposition in the relative major, D. This exposition is quite long compared to other sonatas and it may be for this reason many pianists choose to omit the exposition repeat. Motives of the original theme emerge in the development, which, unconventionally, returns to the second theme (as opposed to the first) for the recapitulation, which is in B major.The scherzo, in the distant key of E-flat major and in strict ternary form, characterised by ebullient quaver runs in the right hand, with a more demure chordal middle section in B major. If played slowly, the main E-flat major theme sounds somewhat similar to the E-flat major melody from the composer's Ballade No. 1. Unlike the scherzo of the B-flat minor sonata (and, indeed, the rest of Chopin's contributions to the genre outside of the sonatas), it is exceptionally short, typically lasting barely two minutes in performance.Despite a stormy introduction in dotted rhythm, the largo is serene, almost nocturne-like; an immensely beautiful melody is introduced, followed by a mellow and expansive middle section in E major, again characterised by quaver figuration in the background of an intensely harmonic line, separating the more cantabile outer sections in B major. It is the most musically profound of the movements, in terms of a sustained melody and innovative harmonic progression; it rivals the extensive first movement in length alone.Its turbulent and dramatic introduction a rising harmonic progression left hanging on a high dominant seventh aside, the finale, in B minor, is pervaded by a "galloping" rhythm; emphasis in the melodic line on the first and third beats of each half-measure outlines the fifth through eighth degrees of a harmonic minor scale, in this case the F and B, lending prominence to the augmented second between the sixth and raised seventh scale degrees, the G and A. The overall melody, chromatic yet rooted in the minor tonic, contributes a dark mood to these primary sections. A more triumphant second theme in B major, repeated twice in the movement's ABABA form, appears quite suddenly at the conclusion of the first (likewise when repeated); eventually rising during fleet-fingered runs over a left-hand melody, it tumbles back to a dramatic restatement of the main theme in both of its appearances. The piece concludes in a jubilant B major coda.
Shelter: N.D.G. Home Showcases Warmth of Wood and Woven Rugs
Sarah Dougherty has had an eclectic career. She earned a degree in English literature in Vermont. Following that she came back to Montreal to do a law degree, after which she worked for many years in a private practise. Dougherty then decided to become a student once more, earning a master's degree in journalism. For 10 years she worked as a freelance writer, specializing in business and sports and contributing to major newspapers and magazines.In 2009, her career took yet another turn. This time, Dougherty combined her two skills - journalism and law. She now works for a non-profit called éducaloi, which helps people through the tangle of legalese that tends to confound the lay person. Éducaloi does not take on actualcases, but merely simplifies procedures for the average Joe. Dougherty's title at the organization -plain language specialist -says it all.Throughout the various changes in her life, Doughertylived for the most part in Notre-Dame-de-Grce, an area she loves. Seven years ago, however, she had to move from her apartment when the landlord wanted to take back the building. As luck would have it, she found another, similar apartment on the very same street.Her current home is the upper floor of a 1931 duplex. It has three bedrooms and two balconies. It has the architectural features typical of its era -hardwood floors (with contrasting inlay in the living room), french doors at one end of the hallway, original wood trim, multi-paned leaded windows and a fireplace,which now harbours a wood-burning stove. The interior is warm and welcoming -an effect created by the glow of Dougherty's antique furniture and the many rugs and decorative fabrics that adorn the rooms.I have an Iranian friend who sells kilims and other things, like the cushions in my spare bedroom and the strip of fabric with the tassels that hangs above my own bed. That was once a decoration for a nomad's tent.My mother tells me this was called a "captain's chest" because it splits into two parts and can be stacked one on top of the other. Apparently, that was so it would fit more easily into a cramped cabin. The owner could leave half of it behind when he went to sea.I did, and everything fit! In fact, I even have a few extra pieces, because when my mother sold her house, she distributed some of her belongings to her children. I inherited quite a few things but I've also been collecting antiques for years.The butterfly table gets its name from the way the extensions pull out and up.Different places. Two came from Cuba, and they're made by hand. I saw the person making them with straw. This tightly woven piece -I think it's a sieve -came from Africa. The hat I bought in Chinatown in Vancouver, but whether it actually came from China itself, I'm not sure.Shelter is a weekly series featuring a conversation with tenants or condo owners.Sarah Dougherty, 55 N.D.G. 1,300 square feet (plus two balconies and storage space in the basement) $1,225: Since 2009
Fair Out to Get More Furniture Buyers
UBM Malaysia will be kicking off the 22nd edition of the Malaysian International Furniture Fair (MIFF) tomorrow.Happening from March 1 to 5, the fair will be the first to see to the alliance between UBM Asia and Chinese e-commerce giant, Alibaba Group, under the latter's Trade Assurance Programme.According to UBM Asia managing director (Asean Business) M. Gandhi, the programme was previously limited to Chinese manufacturing companies and has never been done beyond the country."Malaysia is the first country where this programme will be carried out; we have carefully selected 100 Malaysian furniture manufacturers for this," he said.Gandhi noted that through the programme, Alibaba will vouch for the standards and quality of product as well as the delivery time, or buyers' money back."The whole idea of this is to encourage more export and to get more buyers into Malaysia," he said.In addition to the programme, the 100 manufacturers will also be listed as "gold suppliers" in which they will be the first to be prompted in relevant searches and enquiries at Alibaba's site."UBM's collaboration with Alibaba Group extends the online experience to the floor as interested buyers can register through the website and meet the manufacturer here in Malaysia, after which they can go back to O-and-O (online to offline marketing)," added MIFF general manager Karen Goi.Gandhi said the pilot programme here can be a test to measure how Malaysian exporters can go beyond."The programme will be free of charge for selected manufacturers from March to May, but should they wish to continue, Matrade is ready to extend their support," she added.The strategic alliance is a global agreement between UBM worldwide and Alibaba Group.Speaking at the press conference, MIFF chairman Datuk Dr Tan Chin Huat said MIFF was a 100% exporters' avenue."Over the last two years, exhibition scales and export performances have been on a low and participants have also sized down."But MIFF remains strong because of the trade fair's nature, which is export," he highlighted.He also said that MIFF forecasts the total export sales to grow by 5%."We hope to surpass US$900mil this year, from US$865mil last year." The fair will take place at two locations simultaneously - Putra World Trade Centre (PWTC) and the Matrade Exhibition and Convention Centre (MECC) - taking up a total of 80,000sqm in space.Five hundred furniture manufacturers and exporters from 14 countries will be exhibiting its products, including Malaysia, China, Taiwan, Indonesia, Hong Kong, South Korea, India, Vietnam, United States, Spain, Italy, France and Finland.Marking another first for the fair, Japan will also be participating in the exhibition."Six Japanese manufacturing companies will be joining in, and this marks the first time they have taken part in an overseas exhibition."We have received word that many buyers are anticipating Japanese fine furniture," Goi shared.The five-day exhibition is expecting to draw 20,000 visitors, of which 6,000 are international buyers from 140 countries.The opening ceremony at Seri Pacific Hotel tomorrow, will see the presence of Deputy Prime Minister Datuk Dr Ahmad Zahid Hamidi while International Trade and Industry Minister II Datuk Seri Ong Ka Chuan is set to attend the Buyers Night, which will take place on March 2 at Sunway Putra Hotel Kuala Lumpur.Among other highlights include the Furniture Excellence Award, Best Presentation Award and MIFF Furniture Design Competition prize presentation ceremony as well as industry seminars featuring speakers such as Shinichi Mitsuki from Mitsui Designtec Co Ltd in Japan, as well as Australia Furniture Associations (AFA) chief executive officer Patrizia Torelli.In addition, Gandhi shared that MIFF will increase its show size by 25% in 2018 in line with the completion of Matrade's new venue, MITEC, by the year end of 2017."With the new venue in place, we will be able to segment exhibitors accordingly - office and mass market manufacturers at PWTC as well as house and home market manufacturers at MITEC," he said.
Everything You Need From the Kitchen Furniture Suppliers in Harlow
Offering quality of services to their clients is the foremost goal of every organization. In the similar manner owners dealing with hospitality and catering business also focus on their key factors so as to fulfil their client's requirement in the best manner. Some of the focal points in this business are food quality, ambiance of the restaurant and the catering equipment along with Kitchen Furniture Suppliers in Harlow. Food quality depends upon the chef, and friendly and eye soothing ambiance can be created by the location of the restaurant and the type of visitors. But the last factor that is catering equipment is the whole sole your responsibility. It requires that the equipment you use must meet the local safety standards. The reason behind this is to keep your kitchen environment protected and clean.Okay you can easily find a number of kitchen furniture suppliers in Harlow offering catering equipment according to the local standards. The best thing about them is that their services are not only limited to the offline local stores, but are also shifting to the World Wide Web. Because of their online presence they can better fulfil your requirements as they have created a niche in the market. These leading kitchen equipment suppliers provide their services to every organization irrespective of their size. For them each client has equal importance and they serve each of them at their best.In order to enhance your dining experience these Kitchen Furniture Suppliers in Harlow offer a wide range of products. Some of these supplies include bar-wares, chef's clothing like apron, coat, trouser, footwear and many more, products for health and safety, a variety of glassware depending upon the requirement, crockery, cutlery, disposables, furniture, food transportation and other heavy equipment. Because of their online presence you can easily visit their website and review each and every product in detail. This way you can order for the best required product by sitting at your place. Moreover, while shopping online you can also get special discounts that will offer you the best deal you have ever experienced in your life. Not only this, they won't charge any shipping charges for the order placed. In other words, they will deliver your order at your doorstep without charging any delivery charges.But the unique factor about the services of these suppliers is that their services don't end with the supplying of these items. Apart from this they also offer hospitality design services to their clients. Such services include planning and designing your new kitchen that comes to an end with the installation services. These services offer benefits for long-term in terms of operating cost, better workflow and efficient labor usage. They use latest computer technology in the process of planning and designing your new commercial kitchen. Not only had this because of their years of experience in this field they offer services of experienced staff who will work better in order to cater your requirements. In a nutshell, these suppliers offer qualitative kitchen equipment at competitive prices that will be easily affordable by every business irrespective of their size. This way you can achieve a higher standard in the industry without incurring much cost.·RELATED QUESTIONWho are the best modern furniture suppliers?Who are the best modern furniture suppliers?It depends on who is buying, and how much.As you see, I work in the furniture field since - errr, forever - so I am quite into the distribution business as well.And one of the main issues of the furniture business regarding distribution is that nowadays it is an enormous mess.With the development of online distribution, as for Amazon, along with the fact that it has happened during the Big Recession, most of the furniture companies around the world have experienced severe problems.The reasons are many: but the main issue is that to fully understand what you are buuying, you need to try the items you want to buy. You need to sit on them, examine how they are made, understand the coverings available and the finishings.And this is hardly possible on a computer screen.Add to this situation the fact that most of the fiurniture you buy needs some complicate assembly and installation, and you end up with a very tricky situation where the quality and the design of the piece you want to buy plays just a little part in the whole equation.And also, the distribution model has changed, and is changing constantly. The latest innovations come from the big groups. From Amazon, which is developing its own line of furniture, and has launched some models recevtly, and IKEA, which is offering a lease option to the public.So, in a situation like this, the consumer is left rightfully wondering what the best option would be - and I can say only one thing:There is no magic formula in buying furniture: each buyer has his own preferences.I have known people who would merrily buy everything online without skipping a beat, even the most costly pieces, and others which would require to try personally even the fabric of a single pillow - so, as you can see, there is no universal way to buy furniture.If you are a professional retailer, the situation changes drastically.In this case, there is only one way to buy furniture professionally - and it is, if you want to avoid surprises, to go straight to the source of the items. That is, to the place where they are presented and made available.And I am talking about the furniture fairs.Before the internet, before the computers, furniture was made and sold through furniture fairs, and natworks of brick and mortar stores in the different nations. But to meet the source of supply, for economic reasons, the best bet was to visit a trade fair.The best ones are the usual suspects: Milan Salone del Mobile, Cologne IMM Cologne, Paris Maison & Objet, London 100% Design - just to stay in Europe (but Milan is the most important fair in the world, design-wise).If you are living in the USA, I would mention also the ICFF in New York and the famous High Point Market exhibition.But for the majority of the world market, and not just for the most select styles (which play a smallish part of the whiole market), you have to turn East.That is, to China.The Chinese fairs are sort of amazing, and growing steadily year by year, both for affluence and the quality of the products. And one of them actually is picking up speed amazingly, which is CIFF.The China International Furniture Fairis one of the most established in the business, and is organized twice a year, in March and in September, respectively in Guangzhou and in Shanghai.The next edition of the CIFF will is scheduled for March 18-21, 2019 in Guangzhou - the city is what Westerners used to call Canton. The 43rd edition of CIFF will take place at in Hongqiao district of Guangzhou over two phases, a solution which is necessary to accommodate the whole field of the furniture business: the 1st, from 18 to 21 March 2019, is dedicated to home furnishings, outdoor and leisure furniture, home décor and home textiles; the 2nd, from 28 to 31 March, will instead be focused in office furniture, hotel furnishings, accessories, metal furniture, and furnishings for public spaces and reception areas. It will also sport a space dedicated to materials and machinery for the furniture industry.The results of the fair are very clear. CIFF Guangzhou had an enormous success, with a 36% more affluence of the past edition, and will host over 4,100 exhibitors in the premises of the fair, extending over 760,000 square metres, around 50% more than the last edition.The quality of the products have improved substantially. Most of the recent Chinese furniture production is stylishly made and offers a very good quality, up on a par with comparable Western furniture of the same level and niche. Forget your preconceptions about flimsy products and dangerous materials - it is not going to happen anymore.And apart from the quality of the products and strategic alliances that the Fair has secured, the same participating companies are proceeding at the fastest pace to serve their customers worldwide, many of them offering a nononsense complete service to manage easily the import/export practices from China to everywhere esle in the world.So, if you are a professional furniture retailer, visiting CIFF would be a smart idea. More, CIFF is held concurrently to another very good furniture fair, which is Furniture China, so you could visit both (and well, there are many of the bigger companies which exhibit in both fairs.As a note to my readers, I mostly write about high-end and luxury objects, like watches, furniture and design: so if you are interested in those fields, be sure to check my other answers and follow me. And a nice upvote is always welcome!I am writing professionally on behalf of the company detailed in the link above. If you are a Facebook or Instagram user and like watches, please "like" The Watchonomicon. You will find links on articles, and other interesting stuff there - together with some special offers on very special watches for sale.If you think my answers are worthwhile, please nominate them here: Publish This: Quora's Publishing Nominations Blog
The Home Front: Using Your Outdoor Living Areas Year Round
In Vancouver and all across North America, people are now using their outdoor living areas year round, says Joanna Leung, vice-president of Vancouver-based , which has specialized in outdoor furniture since 1980."I see more and more people with slightly covered [outdoor] areas," Leung says. "It won't be fully enclosed, but they'll have awnings or they'll have glass on top. Because it's not really the cold that bothers people; it's getting wet." Large waterproof umbrellas can also do the trick, Leung says."Combined with cosy pillows, blankets and maybe a fire pit or space heater, you're good to go in winter months," she says.Fire pits, she notes, are proving to be more popular than ever."Even in November, when the months are getting a bit cooler, having a fire pit is a great asset, and something we make a lot of," she says. "It's like having a fireplace outside. It's great for warmth, it's a focal point for the space, and it really grounds things, because it makes it feel like the living room. It's communal and it's nice to have a glass of wine around." Round fire pits are currently trending and add to the communal "around-the-campfire feel" outdoor fires are known for, she says, adding that the latest fire pit designs are more bar table height."People always think of fire pits as lower like living room pieces" Leung says "But a lot of people like the bar height or counter height." These bar-height versions are particularly popular in cities like Vancouver because outdoor living areas are often small and people want to take advantage of views."When you're sitting down low, you can't get the view, and Vancouver is one of those places that's gorgeous and everyone wants to catch the mountain view, so a lot of people use countertop-height fire pits as well as bar-height fire pits." Outdoor furniture design is changing and becoming more sophisticated and detail orientated, she says."People really want to create the outdoor space as an extension of the indoor space," she says. "I think traditionally, outdoor furniture was woven, like wicker, and now we've really changed up the trends. We have a lot more upholstered pieces, we have upholstered platform pieces that look like indoor furniture, and they use fabrics like chenille that is a really indoor texture and feel, so it feels like you're sitting on a living room sofa, but you're outside." Ratana's new line is a good example of this evolution, she says, with its thick, woven, knitwear-like esthetic, which is currently trending in both home design and fashion."The Bogota collection is a very beautiful collection inspired by the indoors. It looks and feels like a woven material, but inside there's a rubber lining to create that thickness, and then the upholstered fabric is wrapped around it, so it creates that beautiful lush look, like a thick knitted sweater, but it's very quick to dry. Because we've been in the outdoor furniture industry for so long, we know you can't have furniture that takes days and days to dry." In a city like Vancouver, it's important to be realistic about the weather, Leung says, noting that Ratana recommends that outdoor furniture pillows be taken inside when not in use during the winter months. The frames of the outdoor furniture pieces, however, are fine to be left out year round, she says.Because outdoor furniture is not something you replace often, Leung recommends people stick with neutral colours for the frames and add colour and pattern with cushions, throws and pillows."I think keeping your frame really neutral lets you focus on the actual materials, and how beautiful they are, and it also gives people an opportunity to keep current," she says. "And because we're using the same outdoor furniture all year round, you might not want the same throw all year round; you might want some cushions and throws for the spring. You want something different for the summer, you want something different for the fall, so those are things that are really easy to change up if you get bored or you want something more on trend or current."
Volatile Trade, Inventories Boost U.S. Growth to 3.2 Percent in First Quarter
WASHINGTON, April 26 (Reuters) - - U.S. economic growth accelerated in the first quarter, but the burst in growth was driven by a smaller trade deficit and the largest accumulation of unsold merchandise since 2015, temporary boosters that are seen weighing on the economy later this year.The surge in growth reported by the Commerce Department on Friday put to rest fears of a recession, that were stoked by a brief inversion of the U.S. Treasury yield curve in March. But it also exaggerates the health of the economy as consumer and business spending slowed sharply, and investment in homebuilding contracted for a fifth straight quarter.Gross domestic product increased at a 3.2 percent annualized rate in the first quarter, the government said in its advance GDP report. Growth was also driven by increased investment in roads by local and state governments."The gain in first-quarter GDP would seem to make a mockery of claims that the U.S. economy is slowing as the fiscal stimulus fades," said Paul Ashworth, chief U.S. economist at Capital Economics in Toronto. "Looking beyond the headline number, however, there are plenty of causes for concern." The economy grew at a 2.2 percent pace in the October-December period. Economists polled by Reuters had forecast GDP increasing at a 2.0 percent rate in the first three months of the year. The economy will mark 10 years of expansion in July, the longest on record.President Donald Trump cheered the economy's performance in the first quarter. "This is far above expectations or projections," Trump tweeted.The White House has sought to boost growth through an array of policies, including a $1.5 trillion (£1.2 trillion) tax cut package passed in December 2017. Economists believe the fiscal stimulus, which also included more government spending, peaked in the third quarter.They expect GDP to slow this year, with annual growth forecast around 2.5 percent, below the Trump's administration's 3 percent target. The economy missed the growth target in 2018.Excluding trade, inventories and government spending, the economy grew at only a 1.3 percent rate in the first quarter, the slowest since the second quarter of 2013. This measure of domestic demand increased at a 2.6 percent pace in the October-December quarter.A gauge of inflation tracked by the Federal Reserve increased at a 1.3 percent rate last quarter. Fed policymakers are likely to shrug off the last quarter's growth spurt and focus on the weak domestic demand and inflation when they meet next week.The U.S. central bank recently suspended its three-year monetary policy tightening campaign, dropping forecasts for any interest rate increases this year. The Fed raised borrowing costs four times in 2018."The Fed will focus on the composition of growth, which points to a slowing trend amid softening inflation," said Joe Brusuelas, chief economist at RSM in New York. "This data reinforces the prudent pause the Fed is engaged in." The dollar dropped against a basket of currencies as investors fretted over the weak details of the GDP report. U.S. Treasury prices rose, while stocks on Wall Street were mixed.Exports surged and imports declined in the first quarter, leading to a small deficit that added 1.03 percentage points to GDP after being neutral in the fourth quarter. Trade tensions between the United States and China have caused wild swings in the trade deficit, with exporters and importers trying to stay ahead of the tariff fight between the two economic giants.The standoff has also had an impact on inventories, which increased at a $128.4 billion rate in the first quarter, the strongest pace since the second quarter of 2015. Inventories increased at a $96.8 billion pace in the October-December quarter. Part of the inventory build was because of weak demand, especially in the automotive sector, which is expected to weigh on future production at factories.Inventories contributed 0.65 percentage point to first-quarter GDP after adding one-tenth of a percentage point in the October-December period.Growth in consumer spending, which accounts for more than two-thirds of U.S. economic activity, slowed to a 1.2 percent rate from the fourth quarter's 2.5 percent rate. The moderation in spending reflected a decline in motor vehicle purchases and other goods, likely related to a 35-day shutdown of the federal government. There was also a slowdown in spending on services.The government said the shutdown had subtracted three-tenths of a percentage point from GDP last quarter. Retail sales have since rebounded strongly, pointing to some acceleration in consumption in the second quarter."Momentum in consumer spending picked up toward the end of the first quarter, which augurs well for a better consumption outcome in the second quarter," said Michael Feroli, an economist at JPMorgan in New York. "Even so ... we continue to expect GDP growth to step down to a 2.25 percent pace in second quarter." Business spending on equipment braked sharply, rising at only at a 0.2 percent rate, the slowest since the third quarter of 2016. Spending was held down by weak outlays on agricultural machinery and office furniture. Investment in structures contracted for a third straight quarter.Residential construction fell at a 2.8 percent rate, marking the fifth straight quarterly decline. Government investment rebounded at a 2.4 percent rate, driven by spending at state and local governments. Federal government spending was flat.
Fair Out to Get More Furniture Buyers
UBM Malaysia will be kicking off the 22nd edition of the Malaysian International Furniture Fair (MIFF) tomorrow.Happening from March 1 to 5, the fair will be the first to see to the alliance between UBM Asia and Chinese e-commerce giant, Alibaba Group, under the latter's Trade Assurance Programme.According to UBM Asia managing director (Asean Business) M. Gandhi, the programme was previously limited to Chinese manufacturing companies and has never been done beyond the country."Malaysia is the first country where this programme will be carried out; we have carefully selected 100 Malaysian furniture manufacturers for this," he said.Gandhi noted that through the programme, Alibaba will vouch for the standards and quality of product as well as the delivery time, or buyers' money back."The whole idea of this is to encourage more export and to get more buyers into Malaysia," he said.In addition to the programme, the 100 manufacturers will also be listed as "gold suppliers" in which they will be the first to be prompted in relevant searches and enquiries at Alibaba's site."UBM's collaboration with Alibaba Group extends the online experience to the floor as interested buyers can register through the website and meet the manufacturer here in Malaysia, after which they can go back to O-and-O (online to offline marketing)," added MIFF general manager Karen Goi.Gandhi said the pilot programme here can be a test to measure how Malaysian exporters can go beyond."The programme will be free of charge for selected manufacturers from March to May, but should they wish to continue, Matrade is ready to extend their support," she added.The strategic alliance is a global agreement between UBM worldwide and Alibaba Group.Speaking at the press conference, MIFF chairman Datuk Dr Tan Chin Huat said MIFF was a 100% exporters' avenue."Over the last two years, exhibition scales and export performances have been on a low and participants have also sized down."But MIFF remains strong because of the trade fair's nature, which is export," he highlighted.He also said that MIFF forecasts the total export sales to grow by 5%."We hope to surpass US$900mil this year, from US$865mil last year." The fair will take place at two locations simultaneously - Putra World Trade Centre (PWTC) and the Matrade Exhibition and Convention Centre (MECC) - taking up a total of 80,000sqm in space.Five hundred furniture manufacturers and exporters from 14 countries will be exhibiting its products, including Malaysia, China, Taiwan, Indonesia, Hong Kong, South Korea, India, Vietnam, United States, Spain, Italy, France and Finland.Marking another first for the fair, Japan will also be participating in the exhibition."Six Japanese manufacturing companies will be joining in, and this marks the first time they have taken part in an overseas exhibition."We have received word that many buyers are anticipating Japanese fine furniture," Goi shared.The five-day exhibition is expecting to draw 20,000 visitors, of which 6,000 are international buyers from 140 countries.The opening ceremony at Seri Pacific Hotel tomorrow, will see the presence of Deputy Prime Minister Datuk Dr Ahmad Zahid Hamidi while International Trade and Industry Minister II Datuk Seri Ong Ka Chuan is set to attend the Buyers Night, which will take place on March 2 at Sunway Putra Hotel Kuala Lumpur.Among other highlights include the Furniture Excellence Award, Best Presentation Award and MIFF Furniture Design Competition prize presentation ceremony as well as industry seminars featuring speakers such as Shinichi Mitsuki from Mitsui Designtec Co Ltd in Japan, as well as Australia Furniture Associations (AFA) chief executive officer Patrizia Torelli.In addition, Gandhi shared that MIFF will increase its show size by 25% in 2018 in line with the completion of Matrade's new venue, MITEC, by the year end of 2017."With the new venue in place, we will be able to segment exhibitors accordingly - office and mass market manufacturers at PWTC as well as house and home market manufacturers at MITEC," he said.
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